Click Below for Full Article

http://bit.ly/Al1ady

The Brigg’s property hearing ended with a unanimous vote by the Portsmouth Town Council to reject the petitioners request for rezoning the parcel from lt. industrial to commercial. Residents packed the room and had many concerns and questions for the council. Despite the variety of speakers, the consensus was that it would not be in the best interest of the surrounding are and town in general to grant this request. We DO NEED a way to generate revenue for the town tax base. IF ANYONE has any good, viable ideas to do so, please contact the Portsmouth, RI EDC (Economic Development Committee) as they are working very hard to generate ideas for supplemental revenue. Their link is below…

http://portsmouthrienergy.com/

click on article for larger image

We Want to Hear From You!!


As a Portsmouth resident or “fan”

of “The Town of Portsmouth,”

what makes this such a

SPECIAL place for you?

 

if you need some help in deciding, feel free to go to this link

and watch the wonderful video of Portsmouth, (just click on Welcome)

under Portsmouth Video Tour Book…

http://www.portsmouthri.com/

Very Important Meeting January 30, 2012!

We would like to make you all aware of the potential for development at The Brigg’s Farm property just west of The Hedley St. intersection in Portsmouth. Whether you approve or disapprove of this development, it is important that all residents, abutters and neighbors in the area know that this is proceeding to the next step.

Vincent Mesolella a former State Rep from Lincoln/ North Providence is lobbying to propose a change in zoning from Light Industrial to Commercial. This would allow for a Big Box development to go in at the location mentioned above. He would like to put in a 150,000 sq. ft. store as his anchor. Preserve Portsmouth fought hard for a size cap on all single use stores.

 

Anyone interested in more details may view the file at Town Hall and then attend the meeting on January 30, 2012 at 7:00pm, at Portsmouth Town Hall.

Below you will see the zoning notice in The Newport Daily News. This is not really a “meeting” as much as a Public Hearing and legal procedural step in the process that can be binding. The notice and preparation for a hearing requires a significant investment of time and money by the applicant. If attendance is light with approval resulting (and proper legal notice was given) there are then very limited rights to appeal the decision in most states.

 

This is not an informal step, this is moving forward and attendance by all who may be impacted, especially abutters, is critical at this juncture.

 

Note the following legal provisions:
1. Proposals shown thereon may be amended or altered prior to the close of the Public Hearing without further advertising as a result of fur there study or because of the views expressed at the Public Hearing.
2. Those persons wishing to be heard should attend and voice their concerns.
3. A copy of the matter under consideration may be obtained or examined at the Office of the Town Clerk. Note: ANYONE WITH INTEREST SHOULD GO DOWN TO GET COPY OR FILE WELL IN ADVANCE AND HAVE IN HAND AT MEETING.
4. NOTE: If you send a written communication that you want read into the record (advisable) follow the 3 days prior notice just to be safe.

 

We hope you can attend the meeting!
Preserve Portsmouth

 

 

Tonight’s Town Council meeting

has several interesting land

use issues on the agenda. There is

an issue that will be

coming up regarding “BIG BOX”

Development on Corey’s Lane.

Monday night 9/12 Town Council

Chambers 7:00 p.m.
 

 


click here for previous posts:

Don’t Subsidize Big Boxes at Local Shops’ Expense

By Stacy Mitchell on September 10, 2011
store-closing-1.jpg

Sifting though the postmortem news of Borders Group’s demise, I came across a local newspaper story about a California town that had spent $1.6 million to lure a Borders bookstore to a local shopping center. According to the paper, government officials in Pico Rivera in 2003 agreed to pay part of a new Borders store’s operating expenses by providing a $10,833 monthly subsidy for the next 15 years.

That might seem like an astonishing amount of public money to give a retail shop, but what’s truly remarkable about the deal is just how unexceptional it actually is. Handing out multimillion-dollar subsidies to large chains has become commonplace in much of the country. These deals are premised on the idea that new shopping centers and big-box stores expand employment and create economic growth. The trouble is, these giveaways have done little more than help large retailers at the expense of small businesses.

Read the rest at Business Week

 

Photo courtesy of Ed Yourdon